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Cryotherapy Machine - Safety and what to expect

The most popular form of cryotherapy involves sitting in a cryotherapy booth for 3–5 minutes.

Some people undergo cryotherapy facials, which apply cold to the face only. Others use a cryotherapy wand to target specific areas, such as a painful joint.

Most people use the term cryotherapy to refer to whole-body cryotherapy.

This is non-medical treatment in a spa or similar setting.

Doctors, however, also use cryotherapy. For instance, very cold temperatures can be used to freeze off warts or cancerous cells.

Though unpleasant to begin with, cryotherapy tends to get better with each treatment, as the body adjusts to the low temperature.

It is generally safe, but it is important to talk to a doctor before trying cryotherapy.

Pregnant women, children, people with severe high blood pressure, and people with heart conditions should not try cryotherapy.

Having a cryotherapy treatment for any longer than a few minutes can be fatal.
A person must never sleep during cryotherapy, and they should time each session to ensure it is not longer than the recommended timeframe.

Benefit

Research may eventually undermine other purported benefits of cryotherapy. However, preliminary studies suggest that cryotherapy may offer the following benefits:

Cryotherapy can help with muscle pain, as well as some joint and muscle disorders, such as arthritis. It may also promote faster healing of athletic injuries.

Doctors have long recommended using ice packs on injured and painful muscles. Doing so may increase blood circulation after the ice pack is removed, promoting healing and pain relief.

A study published in 2000 found that cryotherapy offered temporary relief from the pain of rheumatoid arthritis. The research found that cryotherapy with ice packs could reduce the damaging effects of intense exercise. People who used cryotherapy also reported less pain.

Not all studies support the role of cryotherapy in muscle healing. A 2015 Cochrane Review looked at four studies of cryotherapy for the relief of muscle pain and found no significant benefits.